Last edited by Magor
Monday, May 18, 2020 | History

8 edition of Biology of the plant cuticle found in the catalog.

Biology of the plant cuticle

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Published by Blackwell Pub. in Oxford, UK, Ames, Iowa .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Plant cuticle.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    Statementedited by Markus Riederer & Caroline Muller.
    ContributionsRiederer, Markus., Muller, Caroline.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQK725 .B575 2006
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3407180M
    ISBN 10140513268X
    ISBN 109781405132688
    LC Control Number2005022952

    Epidermal cells secrete a waxy substance called cuticle, which coats, waterproofs, and protects the above-ground parts of plants. Cuticle helps prevent water loss, abrasions, infections, and damage from toxins. This tissue includes several types of specialized cells.   The plant cuticle is an extracellular hydrophobic layer that covers the aerial epidermis of all land plants, providing protection against desiccation and external environmental stresses. The past decade has seen considerable progress in assembling models for the biosynthesis of its two major components, the polymer cutin and cuticular by:

    State that dicotyledonous plant have apical and lateral meristems. Meristem: a plant's region where cells continue to divide and grow, often throughout it's life. Compare growth due to apical and lateral meristems in dicotyledonous plants. Apical meristem exists at the root and shoot tip, and is involved in plant elongation.   The cuticle is a non-cellular, waxy protective layer covering the outer cell layer of the green, aerial parts of land plants. Cuticles protect plants against desiccation (losing water to the air), UV radiation, and many kinds of physical, chemical, and biological agents. The cuticle has basically the same function as the human skin: it protects.

    Plant cuticles provide barriers to water loss and arose as aquatic plants adapted to the dry terrestrial environment. The cuticle components, waxes and the fatty acid-based polymer cutin, are synthesized in the plant epidermis, exported across the cell wall, and deposited on the plant surface. This study suggests a role for PHYTOCHROME light receptors during cuticle development in leaves of.   The waxy cuticle seals up the leaf so that the only way in and out are through the stomata, which are regulated by the guard cells. So from top to bottom, a leaf's structure: Waxy cuticle .


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Biology of the plant cuticle Download PDF EPUB FB2

This is the first experiment-based comprehensive scientific book devoted the plant cuticle since the 's that is not a compilation of conference proceedings [and] is of interest to ecologists. This is the first experiment-based comprehensive scientific book devoted the plant cuticle since the 's that is not a compilation of conference proceedings [and] is of interest to ecologists, environmental scientists, entomologists, and phytopathologists.

Summary This chapter contains sections titled: The evolution of the plant cuticle Major functions of the plant cuticle Convergence with other integuments Objectives of this book Introduction: Biology of the Plant Cuticle - Annual Plant Reviews Volume Biology of the Plant Cuticle - Wiley Online LibraryCited by:   This is the first experiment-based comprehensive scientific book devoted the plant cuticle since the 's that is not a compilation of conference proceedings [and] is of interest to ecologists, environmental scientists, entomologists, and phytopathologists.

In addition, information for horticultural scientists is included. MainAnnual Plant Reviews, Biology of the Plant Cuticle.

Annual Plant Reviews, Biology of the Plant Cuticle. Markus Riederer, Caroline Muller. Annual Plant Reviews, Volume 23 A much clearer picture is now emerging of the fine structure of the plant cuticle and its surface, the composition of cuticular waxes and the biosynthetic pathways leading to them.

Biology of the Plant Cuticle by Markus Riederer,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Their topics include the fine structure of the plant cuticle, the biopolymer matrix, the biosynthesis and transport of plant cuticular waxes, optical properties of plant surfaces, microbial communities in the phyllosphere, and plant-insect interactions on cuticular surfaces.

([c] Book News, Inc., Portland, OR). 1 Introduction: biology of the plant cuticle 1 MARKUS RIEDERER The evolution of the plant cuticle 1 Major functions of the plant cuticle 2 Transpiration control 2 Control of loss and uptake of polar solutes 3 Controlling the exchange of gases and vapours 3 Transport of lipophilic substances 4File Size: KB.

Request PDF | On Mar 1,Gerhard Kerstiens and others published [Book Review: Biology of the Plant Cuticle. Annual Plant Reviews, Volume ] | Find, read and cite all the research you need. In some higher plants, the cuticle is a water-impervious protective layer covering the epidermal cells of leaves and other parts and limiting water loss.

It consists of cutin, a waxy, water-repellent substance allied to suberin, which is found in the cell walls of corky tissue. Cutin is the major structural component (30–70%) of the plant cuticle, a thin layer of predominantly lipid material that covers all primary aerial surfaces of vascular plants.

The cuticle is Author: Markus Riederer. Plant Cuticles: An Integrated Functional Approach (Environmental Plant Biology) Hardcover – January 1, by G.

Kerstiens (Ed) (Editor) See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Format: Hardcover.

Biology of the plant cuticle. [Markus Riederer; Caroline Muller;] -- Detailing the developments in the field, this book is directed at researchers and professionals in plant biochemistry, plant physiology, plant ecology, phytopathology and environmental microbiology.

Biology of the Arthropod Cuticle. Usually dispatched within 3 to 5 business days. Mention the words 'arthropod cuticle' to most biologists and they usually provoke a glazed expression. This is because the cuticle is commonly regarded as an inert substance. It is hoped that this book will dispel this fallacy.

Biology of the Plant Cuticle (Annual Plant Reviews, Vol. 23) (Volume 23) by Markus Riederer (Editor), Caroline Muller (Editor). Wiley-Blackwell, Volume Hardcover.

Used:Good. Category: Biology Biology of the Plant Cuticle (Annual Plant Reviews, Vol. 23) (Volume 23) free ebook download. Annual Plant Reviews, Biology of the Plant Cuticle - ISBN: - (ebook) - von Markus Riederer, Caroline Muller, Verlag: Wiley-Blackwell.

A review of the first book published on the plant cuticle almost 50 years ago (Martin and Juniper, ) stated how neglected the outer layers of epidermal cells had been in the plant biology literature, and expressed hope that the timely book would help in correcting this underestimation.

These expectations have been greatly exceeded, and Cited by:   The plant cuticle is an extracellular hydrophobic layer that covers the aerial epidermis of all land plants, providing protection against desiccation and external environmental stresses.

The past decade has seen considerable progress in assembling models for the biosynthesis of its two major components, the polymer cutin and cuticular waxes. The plant cuticle is the interface between the organism and its environment.

As such, it plays key roles a wide range of interactions with the environment, both abiotic and biotic. It is a hydrophobic surface, composed of both monomeric constituents, the very long-chain fatty acid derivatives known as waxes, and the complex polyester, cutin.

Biology Notes Form 1 PDF. Biology Form 1 Questions and Answers. KLB Biology Form 1 Notes. Free Biology Form 1 Notes. Biology Form 1 Revision Questions. Biology Form 1 All Chapters. Biology Notes Form One PDF. Biology Form 1 Book.

Biology Form One Syllabus. Biology Revision.Biology of the Plant Cuticle; Contributors; Preface; 1 Introduction: biology of the plant cuticle; 2 The fine structure of the plant cuticle; 3 The cutin biopolymer matrix; 4 Composition of plant cuticular waxes; 5 Biosynthesis and transport of plant cuticular waxes; 6 Optical properties of plant surfaces; 7 Transport of lipophilic non-electrolytes across the cuticle; 8 Characterisation of polar paths of transport in plant .Topical Review on Cuticle Synthesis and Function The Formation and Function of Plant Cuticles1 Trevor H.

Yeats2 and Jocelyn K.C. Rose* Department of Plant Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York The plant cuticle is an extracellular hydrophobic layer that covers the aerial epidermis of all land plants, providing protectionCited by: